Practice Test Questions for Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence™ – (WPPSI™ – III and IV tests)

The WPPSI 3 and 4 tests (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence) test measures intellectual abilities in young children.

If your child is taking the Weschsler test you can also practice questions for the Stanford-Binet® test, CogAT® test, and OLSAT® test. Many of the same types of questions are on each of these tests. Below you’ll find practice questions to ask your little one to see how they respond. The WPPSI test is done one-on-one with a trained psychologist. Many private schools require children to take the WPPSI test prior to getting admitted into the private school. Many people use ERB test synonymously with WPPSI test but the ERB is not a test. The ERB (Education Records Bureau) is the association that administers the tests, not the actual test itself.

The strengths of the WPPSI test for young children is they are colorful and the test keeps the attention span of the child since they find the WPPSI test interesting. Subtests of the WPPSI-III and WPPSI-IV tests offer a variety samples and often second chances to assure the child performs best during the test or her abilities. The WPPSI test scores allow partial credit. The WPPSI test is not without drawbacks. Free practice questions for the WPPSI-III and IV tests can be found online at various web sites.

 

Practice Question for WPPSI Test – Pre-K to Kindergarten

1. Why do you think those 2 pictures go together?

 

Practice Question for WPPSI Test – First Grade and Second Grade

2. Look at the pictures in the 2 rows below.  Choose 1 picture from the first row that goes with 1 picture from the second row. Why do you think those 2 pictures go together?

 

Practice Question for WPPSI Test – First and Second Grade

3.  Parent Instuctions In this WPPSI test subtest, your child is given 90 seconds to put together a frameless puzzle.  This assesses many different skills including visual-spatial reasoning, small motor skills, problem solving abilities, processing speed, and more.

  • Print out each image on a color printer.
  • Use a glue stick to adhere the image to cardboard.
  • Cut around the edges of the picture.
  • Cut the overall picture into pieces, following the broken lines inside the image.
  • Keep the pieces of each puzzle together in a plastic bag.

 

For each Puzzle:

  • Line up the pieces of the puzzle in a row in front of your child.
  • Tell your child what the puzzle will make when it is put together.
  • Say, “Can you put these puzzle pieces together to make it look like a butterfly?”
  • If your child hesitates while working say, “Be sure to work as fast as you can!”

Practice Question for WPPSI Test – First and Second Grade
4. “Look at this picture.  An important part of it is missing.  What’s missing?”

 

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Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence™ – Third Edition and Fourth Edition (WPPSI™ – III and IV) are registered trademarks of Pearson. Pearson is not affiliated with TestingMom.com, nor were they involved in the creation, production and do not endorse or sponsor these practice questions. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only: such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

Cognitive Abilities Test™ (CogAT®) is a registered trademark of Riverside Publishing, a Houghton Mifflin Company, or their affiliate(s), or their licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Houghton Mifflin Company or its affiliates (“Houghton Mifflin”). Houghton Mifflin does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Houghton Mifflin. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

OLSAT® – Otis-Lennon School Ability Test®, Eighth Edition® is a registered trademark of Pearson Education, Inc or its affiliate(s), or their licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Pearson Education, Inc or its affiliates (“Pearson”). Pearson does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Pearson. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales®, Fifth Edition® (SB5®) is a registered trademark of Riverside Publishing, a Houghton Mifflin Company, or their affiliate(s), or their licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Houghton Mifflin Company or its affiliates (“Houghton Mifflin”). Houghton Mifflin does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Houghton Mifflin. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

11 Responses to “Practice Test Questions for Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence™ – (WPPSI™ – III and IV tests)”

Cassie says:

Hi, I have been advised to get my 6 yr old son a wppsi test. I send him to st marys college which is a private school, We have used lots of community programs from the age of 3 and now school is proving to be a struggle.
Where can I get this test done?
How much does the test cost?
Does a health care card help?
Regards
Cassie

keonalynn@gmail.com says:

Assessment Associates, Educational Assessment Associates, L. Isabelle Blackwood-Ellis, Ph.D. Psychological and Educational Associates, and Campbell Psychological Services, LLC are a few place in the MD, DC area. They all provide Independent School Admission Testing- this includes administration of appropriate intellectual test, such as the Wechler Intelligence Test for Children (WISC-IV), Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI), or other intellectual tests (e.g. the Leiter International Performance Scale, a nonverbal test of intelligence when language is an issue), as well as any necessary educational achievement testing.

awash15@hotmail.com says:

Where is a good place online to find some free Wechsler test quetions (WPPSI) for Ages 4 and Age 6?
thanks

Quanle1973@yahoo.com says:

If I want to try out for 1 month how much is it going to cost?

shweta1812@hotmail.com says:

Hi,

I have recently purchased a membership and am looking to find practice questions for Pre-K and KG. There are lot of places where links are available claiming 25000 practice questions but when clicked, they only show 4 and they are for mixed age groups. I am particularly looking for WPPSI and Woodcock Johnson test questions. Can you please point me to the correct link or explain how to go about it?

Your response is much appreciated.

Thanks and Regards,
Shweta

TestingMom.com says:

Hi Sheweta- make sure you are logged into the site and click on “Home” at the top left. AFter that, you’ll see a list of all the tests with practice questions for the WPPSI and Woodcock-Johnson. All of our materials for practice questions are organized by test name and grade level. Thanks!

maryam says:

i listen to your seminar with positive parenting solution as i’m a member. i nee to know how i can ge the free testing survival guide?

TestingMom.com says:

Hi Maryam – just email us at help testing mom. com – we will send it to you right away!

Ellen Kelly says:

Testing Moms,

Please be aware that IQ tests do not measure capability or potential and do not provide perfectly reliable scores. IQ tests are not fixed and do change over the course of development. IQ test items should not be used for practice! By doing this you could be ruining test validity. It also could cause test anxiety in your child.

IQ test scores, under optimal test conditions, account for ONLY 40% to 50% of the current expected achievement. Thus, 50% to 60% of student achievement is related to variables “beyond intelligence.” Motivation, willingness to put forth effort on difficult tasks, a strong work ethic, and persistence are also important and can affect performance on all kinds of tests and in life as well.

If your child scored high on an IQ test, this does not mean than she or he will automatically have high academic achievement or will successful in school or in life. Do not give them feedback about their performance. Research indicates that telling your gifted child his IQ could seriously undermine future academic achievement. It can contribute to performance anxiety or a tendency to give up quickly. Instead of praising children’s intelligence or talent, focus on the processes they used.
Example: “I really admire how long you practiced that speech.” Or ” You really worked hard on that report and it shows. I really learned a lot from reading your report on Hamlet. I had no idea that…..”

If you have preschoolers, allow your child time and space to play make-believe activities with other children. This will help them develop patience, persistence, attention, social skills, and emotional intelligence. These are important attributes that greatly influence learning and success in life that IQ tests cannot tap.

Ellen Kelly, M.A.
School Psychologist

TestingMom.com says:

Thank you so much Ellen for your feedback! We recommend parents work with their child in moderation to give the child an idea of the types of questions that the child might be asked on an IQ test. We never would suggest a parent expose their child to actual questions from the test. Our program is about developing the underlying skills children need to be successful in school and in life!

We agree, it’s so stressful for a 4 year old to be put in a room all alone with complete stranger while the mom and dad have to anxiously await outside the door. So sad that it has to be this way. We didn’t create this system but we give parents a way to adequately respond to as system. We feel our program allows parents and kids to be less stressed when it comes to testing not more stressed since now it’s known what the child should expect in a room all alone with complete stranger

vshreen@yahoo.com says:

can anybody say how many months of preparation is required for a child to take up the test in the month of april

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