Let's Get You Logged In

Not a member? Sign up here

Email

Password

Forgot your password?

NYC Gifted and Talented Test



New York City offers a gifted and talented program for children in kindergarten through 5th grade. Although the admissions for entry into the program take place going into kindergarten, first grade, second grade and third grade.  The entry requirements for this competitive program are based solely on the scores the child receives on the OLSAT test and the NNAT-2 test.

There are two types of gifted and talented programs within New York City:

  • Citywide gifted and talented schools – this is open for students in all boroughs who score at the 97th to 99th percentile
  • District wide gifted and talented schools – these are all offered at the district level and are now available at all 40 districts within all 5 boroughs. A child needs to score at the 90th percentile or above to qualify for this program.



Even at a qualifying score, a student is not guaranteed a seat into the program due to the shear amount of students taking the test and the limited amount of space available. This means even if a child scores at the 99th percentile that child is not guaranteed a seat into this program. Last year, almost 15,000 pre-K students took the NYC G&T test and were vying for approximately 300 citywide seats going into kindergarten.

A pre-K child or a child in a private school applying into this program can take the test in another language besides English. Here are the languages that the NYC Dept. of Ed. Administers the test in:

  • Arabic
  • Bengali
  • Chinese Cantonese
  • Chinese Mandarin
  • French
  • Haitian Creole
  • Korean
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Urdu



The test is given every January and results are revealed to parents in April. After that, the parents tour the schools and prioritize their selection (if their child is eligible). It then takes the NYC DOE iron out the details and send the official letters to parents at the end of May or early June.

Here are a  few tips for parents considering this program:

  • The gifted and talented curriculum varies from school to school so it’s up to the parent to investigate what curriculum the school uses.
  • The G&T options vary widely from district to district. Some districts have 10 programs while others may only have 1 or 2.
  • If your zoned school has a G&T program your child doesn’t get priority over non-zoned kids.
  • The G&T classroom is totally separate from general education classrooms.
  • Depending on where you live there could be logistical difficulties in finding proper transportation for your child to and from school.



Even if your child attends a G&T program from kindergarten through 5th grade doesn’t guarantee priority placement for the middle school admissions. process.

NNAT-2® and Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test® are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Pearson Education, Inc or its affiliate(s), or their licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Pearson Education, Inc or its affiliates (“Pearson”). Pearson does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Pearson. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

OLSAT® – Otis-Lennon School Ability Test, Eighth Edition ® is a registered trademark of Pearson Education, Inc or its affiliate(s), or their licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Pearson Education, Inc or its affiliates (“Pearson”). Pearson does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Pearson. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

Comments are closed.

OK