Let's Get You Logged In

Not a member? Sign up here

Login with Amazon

Email

Password

Forgot your password?

Start Now

100 FREE Practice Questions INSTANTLY

Privacy Protected - We do not sell or share your information with anyone. By submitting you agree to TestingMom.com's terms of use.

May 4th, 2017

Read-Aloud Books for Young Children

posted by

As we begin to shift from spring into summertime, it’s a wonderful time to introduce read aloud books to your young child, if you are not already spending time together this way.  Beyond bonding time, there are so many great intellectual and character-building benefits that are seen from this time, as well. So be intentional to make this a regular habit in your days together.

Read-Aloud Books Boost Your Child’s IQ

Read concept books such as Richard Scarry’s Best First Book Ever (This book has EVERYTHING a child needs to know for kindergarten!) or DK Publishing’s My First Word Book to your child.  Children tested for kindergarten are expected to know colors, shapes, seasons, fruit, farm animals – all the basic information kids are exposed to through picture books, preschool, and life itself.  If your child knows everything covered in these books, she’ll be ready.

Read-Aloud Books Increase Your Child’s Memory

Challenge your child’s memory.  After you read your child a book, ask him to tell you the story back in his own words. Make patterns using Fruit Loops or colored beads, cover them up, and see if he can recreate them. These activities will build your child’s verbal and visual memory.

Read-Aloud Books Teaches Math Concepts

Inject math concepts into your conversations.  “Dinner will be ready in five minutes.”  “Do you want a whole cookie or a half a cookie?”  “Look how cute your toes are.  Let’s count them.” “You have three M&Ms. I’ll give you two more.  Now you’ll have five.” You can even bring up math when reading picture books.  “Look at that funny octopus.  How many legs does he have?”

Read-Aloud Books Solidifies Knowledge and Comprehension’

Knowledge and comprehension are your child’s understanding of information, social standards of behavior, and common sense that children his age usually understand.  To flourish in kindergarten, a child should know colors, shapes, seasons, fruit, farm animals – all the basic kinds of information kids are exposed to through picture books, preschool, and life itself.  He should understand manners and have the sense to get along in the world as a 5-year-old.   It takes time and a parent’s active involvement to acquire all this.  Nothing beats real experiences like going to the doctor, visiting a beach, baking cookies, or taking a trip to the grocery store for acquiring knowledge.  Then after such visits, find read-alouds on those subjects and say, “Remember when…?”  Talk about it together!

Read-Aloud Chapter Books Teaches Patience

Read chapter books as soon as your child is ready (age 4 or 5). This way, he’ll learn to wait for the next installment.  This is a wonderful way to teach your child patience and how anticipating the “next” things can be a fun and wonderful experience!

My Go-To Read- Aloud Book List for Young Children

Goodnight Moon, Margaret Wise Brown

Brown Bear Brown Bear, Eric Carle

The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, Bill Martin Jr.

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, Laura Joffe Numeroff

Dear Zoo, Rod Campbell

The Poky Little Puppy, Janette Sebring Lowrey

Pat the Bunny, Dorothy Kunhardt

Moo, Baa, LA, LA, LA by Sandra Boynton

The Going to Bed Book, Sandra Boynton

Barnyard Dance, Sandra Boynton

Jesse Bear, What Will You Wear, by Nancy White Carlstrom

I’m a Little Caterpillar, by Tim Weare

Love You Forever, Robert N. Munsch

Corduroy, Don Freeman

Is Your Mama a Llama? Deborah Guarino

Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed, Eileen Christelow

Guess How Much I love You, Sam McBratney

Busy Doggies, John Schindel

More, More, More Said the Baby, Vera B. Williams

Goodnight Gorilla, Peggy Rathmann

Peek-A-Boo! Roberta Grobel Intrater

Are You My Mother, P.D. Eastman

Time to Get Dressed, Elivia Savadier

Runaway Bunny, Margaret Wise Brown

Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak

Where is Baby’s Belly Button, Karen Katz

First 100 Words, Roger Priddy

First 100 Animals, Roger Priddy

Toot! By Leslie Patricelli

Share This

Tell Us Your Experiences

Post a new comment

OK
YES
NO