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High School Placement Test (HSPT®) Overview

Free practice questions for High School Placement Test (HSPT®)

Established in 1955, the HSPT is one of the most popular tests administered to 8th graders nationwide that are applying for admission to parochial schools. The test is administered via pencil and paper. For test dates and costs, please check with the high school(s) your 8th grader will be applying for.

The HSPT covers the following subtests:

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Free HSPT Practice Test Verbal Skills Questions

The first two words in the sentence below go together in a certain way. Choose the answer that goes with the third word in the sentence the same way that the first and second words go together.

Cardiology is to heart as theology is to          .

A. mathematics
B. sun
C. engineering
D. religion

Free HSPT Practice Test Quantitative Skills Questions

Look at the numbers in each row below. There is a rule that governs the order in which the numbers occur in the series. Figure out the rule and then choose the number that comes next from the answer choices below.

121     100     81     64     49       

A. 25
B. 36
C. 41
D. 44

Free HSPT Practice Test Reading Questions

A FRENCH LESSON
From A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

When Sara entered the schoolroom the next morning everybody looked at her with wide, interested eyes. By that time every pupil – from Lavina Herbert, who was nearly thirteen and felt quite grown up, to Lottie Leigh, who was only just found and the baby of the school – had heard a great deal about her. They knew very certainly that she was Miss Minchin’s show pupil and was considered a credit to the establishment. One or two of them had even caught a glimpse of her French main, Mariette, who had arrived the evening before. Lavinia had managed to pass Sara’s room when the door was open and had seen Mariette opening a box that had arrived late from some shop.

“It was full of petticoats with lace frills on them – frills and frills,” she whispered to her friend Jessie as she bent over her geography. “I saw her shaking them out. I heard Miss Minchin say to Miss Amelia that her clothes were so grand that they were ridiculous for a child. My mamma says that children should be dressed simply. She has got one of those petticoats on now. I saw it when she sat down.”

“She has silk stockings on!” whispered Jessie, bending over her geography also. “And what little feet! I never saw such little feet!”

“Oh,” sniffed Lavinia, spitefully, “that is the way her slippers are made. My mamma says that even big feet can be made to look small if you have a clever shoemaker. I don’t think she is pretty at all. Her eyes are such an unusual color.”

“She isn’t pretty as other pretty people are,” said Jessie, stealing a glance across the room; “but she makes you want to look at her again. She has tremendously long eyelashes, but her eyes are almost green.”

Sara was sitting quietly in her seat, waiting to be told what to do. She had been placed near Miss Minchin’s desk. She was not abashed at all by the many pairs of eyes watching her. She was interested and looked back quietly at the children who looked at her. She wondered what they were thinking of, and if they liked Miss Minchin, and if they care for their lessons, and if any of them had a papa at all like her own. She had had a long talk with Emily about her papa that morning.

“He is on the sea now, Emily,” she had said. “We must be very great friends to each other and tell each other things. Emily, look at me. You have the nicest eyes I ever saw-but I wish you could speak.”

She was a child full of imaginings and whimsical thoughts, and one of her fancies was that there would be a great deal of comfort in even pretending that Emily was alive and really heard and understood.

After Sara had sat in her seat in the schoolroom for a few minutes, being looked at by the pupils, Miss Minchin rapped in a dignified manner upon her desk.

“Young ladies,” she said, “I wish to introduce you to your new companion.” All the little girls rose in their places, and Sara rose also. “I shall expect you all to be very agreeable to Miss Crewe; she has just come to us from a great distance – in fact, from India. As soon as lessons are over you must make each other’s acquaintance.”

The pupils bowed ceremoniously, and Sara made a little curtsy, and then they sat down and looked at each other again.

“Sara,” said Miss Minchin in her schoolroom manner, “come here to me.”

She had taken a book from the desk and was turning over its leaves. Sara went to her politely.

“As your papa has engaged a French maid for you,” she began, “I conclude that he wishes you to make a special study of the French language.”

How does Sara’s character development contribute to the plot?

A. Her Indian culture makes Sara’s everyday speech and actions seem rude to those in her new home.
B. Her high social status leads other classmates and her teacher to treat her with favoritism.
C. Her wealthy, worldly upbringing creates conflict with other children and leads to a misunderstanding with her teacher.
D. Her inability to understand French causes Sara’s teacher to hold a grudge against her and other students to whisper rudely about her.

Free HSPT Practice Test Mathematics Questions

Jamal is creating a scale drawing of his home. The first floor has an area of 1,200 square feet. He plans to scale down the length of the sides from 10 ft. to 1 in. What is the area of the scale drawing?

A. 120 square feet
B. 12 square feet
C. 120 square inches
D. 12 square inches

Free HSPT Practice Test Language Skills Questions

Choose the sentence that contains an error in punctuation, capitalization, or usage. If there is no error, select choice D.

A. I remember that our old house the one
B. in Jacksonville, had green shutters and
C. a red door. I miss that place.
D. No errors

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