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What is the CCAT Test?

The Canadian Cognitive Abilities Test™ (CCAT™ Test) is a commonly-given group intelligence test used in Canada to qualify students for gifted and talented programs. It requires 90-minutes to administer over three sessions and is available for students in grades K – 12. Unlike the Canadian Test of Basic Skills™, which is an achievement test assessing information and abilities learned in school, the CCAT test is more akin to an IQ test that assesses cognitive or intelligence skills.

The CCAT is designed to determine a child’s aptitude for learning. The result may be seen as predicting, in the short term, the student’s general achievement in school. The CCAT tests the student’s ability to learn and indicates his or her IQ. It should not be seen as a test of achieved learning or “schooling knowledge.”

The CCAT covers questions related to three areas or sets of abilities:

  • Verbal: verbal classification, sentence completion, verbal analogies
  • Quantitative: quantitative relations, number series, equation building
  • Non-Verbal: figure classification, figure analogies, and figure analysis

With the results from CCAT, schools will be able to do the following:

  • Identify at-risk and gifted students
  • Make decisions for grouping students based on scholastic aptitude
  • Plan instructional emphases
  • Identify strengths on which to build success
  • Identify areas where student may be underperforming

Breakdown of the CCAT By Grade Level

Students in grades K.5 – 2.9 take the following subtests:

Verbal – The verbal section assesses a student’s understanding of the structure of language and relationships between words. It measures the ability to use language for reasoning tasks.

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Oral Vocabulary


Quantitative
– The quantitative area measures the student’s abilities for reasoning and problem solving using numbers and mathematical concepts.

  • Relational Concepts
  • Quantitative Concepts


Non-Verbal
– Questions in the nonverbal section contain diagrams and pictures. This section assesses a student’s ability to reason and problem solve independent of language.

  • Figure Classification
  • Matrices

Students in grades 3 – 12 take the following subtests:

Verbal – The verbal section assesses a student’s understanding of the structure of language and relationships between words. It measures the ability to use language for reasoning tasks.

  • Verbal Classification (10 minutes)

What is Verbal Classification?

Verbal Classification is designed to test your child’s conceptual thinking skills. Verbal Classification questions tend to be some of the hardest questions on this test.

  • Sentence Completion (10 minutes)
  • Verbal Analogies (10 minutes)

What are Verbal Analogies?

Verbal Analogies are designed to test your child’s ability to make concrete connections between objects and concepts. Analogies presented in this form are designed to explore your child’s vocabulary and understanding of language.

What is the Quantitative Section?

The quantitative area measures the student’s abilities for reasoning and problem solving using numbers and mathematical concepts.

  • Quantitative Relations (8 minutes)
  • Number Series (10 minutes)
  • Equation Building (12 minutes)

What is the Non-Verbal Section?

Questions in the nonverbal section contain diagrams and pictures. This section assesses a student’s ability to reason and problem solve independent of language.

  • Figure Classification (10 minutes)

What is Figure Classification?

Figure Classification is one of the must intuitive sections on the CCAT™ test, which is good news for you and your child!

Figure Classification requires your child to examine a set of figures and attempt to understand the rules at play, and to be able to group the images according to these rules.

  • Figure Analogies (10 minutes)

What is a Figure Matrix question?

A Figure Matrix question gives your child a series of figures that progress or otherwise fits together in a certain way. One of the spaces is left blank. Your child’s job is to figure out which figure fits into the blank spot so that the series makes sense as a whole.

Figure Matrices are most often expressed in two ways. 
The first is in a “sentence” format, as with the first two matrix question on the right side.

  • Figure Analysis/Paper Folding (10 minutes)

The CCAT is a written “fill in the bubble” test, with multiple choice questions.

Canadian Cognitive Abilities Test™ (CCAT™) is a trademark of Nelson Education, or its affiliate(s), or its licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Nelson Education or its affiliates (“Nelson Education”). Nelson Education does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Nelson Education. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

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