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How are the NYS Assessments Scored?

Your child’s test results serve as an ‘academic checkup’ to make sure your child is on track for the next grade level; measure progress over time so you can see your child’s year-to-year performance; and provide a deeper level of information by pinpointing what skills your child has mastered and what skills your child is still developing.

ELA English Language Arts Test Scores

Performance Level

New York State assigns Performance Levels 4, 3, 2, and 1 to scale scores on the test. Students can score a Level 4 through Level 1 on the test, depending on their scale score (see chart below). See the bottom of this page for definitions of each of the four Performance Levels.

Proficiency Rating

The Proficiency Rating shows where a student falls within a particular Performance Level. Ratings range from 1.0 to 4.5.

Scale Score

Student performance on the test is translated into an overall Scale Score. Scale Scores range from 148 – 423.

NYS English Language Arts Grade 3 Scale Score Ranges

Level 4: 358 – 423
Level 3: 320 – 357
Level 2: 291 – 319
Level 1: 148 – 290

New York City Percentile Range

The percentile range is displayed in quartiles; it shows whether your child’s performance falls in the bottom 25% (0-25%), between 26% and 50%, between 51% and 75%, or in the top 25% (76-100%) of all students in New York City in your child’s grade level and on this test.

Overall State Percentile Range

Same as above, except that this range shows how your child performed relative to all students in New York State in your child’s grade level and on this test.

Additional Information on the ELA Scores

Reading and Writing from Sources Subscores  

Subscores are calculated based on points earned on groups of questions on the test that measure similar or related knowledge or skills.  Subscores provide additional information about how your child performed.  The subscores on the ELA test are divided into Reading and Writing from Sources.  The Reading subscore provides a general sense of your child’s performance on multiple‐choice questions that measure Reading.  These Reading questions measure learning standards in both reading and language conventions.  The Writing from Sources subscore is based on the points earned on short (2‐point) and extended (4‐point) writing questions.  Writing from Sources questions measure learning standards in writing, reading, and language conventions.

Points Earned By Your Child on Reading

Points Earned by Your Child on Reading represents the number of points earned by your child on questions measuring Reading. Your child earns one point for each question that he or she answered correctly. For example, if your child correctly answered 20 questions that measure Reading, he or she will have a score of 20 for Points Earned by Your Child on Reading.

Number of Possible Points on Reading

Number of Possible Points on Reading describes the total number of points measuring Reading that are possible to achieve on the test. This number can be compared with Points Earned By Your Child on Reading. For example, if the Number of Possible Points on Reading is 31 and your child answered 20 questions correctly (score of 20 on Points Earned by Your Child on Reading), then he or she answered 11 of the 31 Reading questions incorrectly.

Average Points Earned Across NY on Reading

The Average Points Earned Across NY on Reading reports the average number of points earned by students throughout New York State. This number can be used to compare your child’s performance to that of the other students throughout the State who took the ELA test in your child’s grade. For example, if your child earned 20 points in Reading, he or she has correctly answered three more Reading questions than the average grade 3 student in the State since the Average Points Earned Across NY on Reading in that grade is 17. Please note that a student may earn more points than average in Reading and still be considered not proficient.

Points Earned by your Child on Writing from Sources

Points Earned by your Child on Writing from Sources represents the total number of points earned on questions measuring Writing from Sources. Questions that measure Writing from Sources include two types of constructed‐response questions:short‐response (maximum of 2 points) and extended‐response (maximum of 4 points).

Number of Possible Points on Writing from Sources

Number of Possible Points on Writing from Sources describes the total number of points a student can earn on questions measuring Writing from Sources. This number can be compared with Points Earned By Your Child for Writing from Sources. For example, if your child earned 17 points on questions that measure Writing from Sources, and there are 24 possible points on questions that measure Writing from Sources, then he or she did not earn seven of the possible points.

Average Points Earned Across NY on Writing from Sources

The Average Points Earned Across NY on Writing from Sources represents the average number of points earned by students throughout New York State on questions that measure Writing from Sources. This number can be used to compare your child’s performance to that of the other students throughout the State who took the ELA test. For example, if your child earned 17 points on questions that measure Writing from Sources, he or she has earned five more points on that section than the average grade 3 student in the State since the Average Points Earned Across NY on Writing from Sources in that grade is 12. Please note that a student may earn more points than average in Writing from Sources and still be considered not proficient.

 

Mathematics Test Scores

Scaling is the process by which test results on the underlying scale are mathematically transformed to numeric (scale) scores. Scale scores reflect the difficulty of the questions when reporting student results. Scale scores are meant to help with the interpretation of test results.

For Further Reading on Scaled Scores:  Why Do Standardized Testing Programs Report Scaled Scores?

 

The New York City Department of Education also creates Individual Student Reports (ISR’s) that provide schools and families with additional information about students’ performance on the previous year’s grades 3 – 8 ELA and math State exams.

The State Education Department plans to have instructional reports returned to teachers by the end of the school year and release at least 75-percent of the test questions. The 2017 Score Reports for parents will feature the updated clearer design and more information about what students should know and be able to do at each grade level. These will be ready over the summer.

Tell us about your experiences

7 Responses

Lena

Hello- do you know how Proficiency Ratings are calculated? Is there a special formula?
Thank you

Eileen

Hello so I received my sons grades apparently from the previous year. (2017)
It shows that the ELA Scale Score is 603… Please explain this
Also shows Proficiency Rating 3.00
His Mathematics Scale Score is 603 as well and Proficiency Rating is 3.08
if Scale Scores range from 148 – 423..
then why is his Proficiency Rating at 3.00 and 3.08.. Thank You

Sam

Hi –
We were able to find this link to provide more information on your child’s scores, but please do keep in mind this is pertinent to this year’s scores and testing as it has been updated for this school year.

Based on these scores, your child is performing at grade level.

Please use this link to find out more information:
http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/ela-math/

Please let us know if you need further assistance. We are here to help.
Best Regards,
Team TestingMom

Rupert

This is excellent information very easy to understand.

Vivian Bednarek

My daughter got 4.06 in the NYS test Math last year 2018. And there was a score of 602. Can you please explain what does the 602 mean? I think the parameters of NYC a 602 is a low level but it wouldn’t make sense since my daughter’s average last year was 97%

Sharmin

Hi , my daughter is going to third grade next year State test .I just wanted to know what is the total score for English language arts and what is the total score for Math state test ?

TestingMom.com

Hello – the scores are released to parents in June or July. The ELA and math are scored on a range of 0.0 up to 4.5 (for each test). The highest score is 4.5. Anything 4.0 or better is considered above grade level. In New York, students usually score better on the math vs. the ELA portion of the test. There are written responses required for both the ELA and math so it’s imperative your daughter practice her writing skills to do well on both exams.

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