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How is the CogAT Test Scored?

The CogAT® is scored based on your child’s age (not grade level). Your child will receive what’s called an SAS, or “Standard Age Score,” which compares your child’s score against other children in the same age range. The highest SAS that a child can receive on the CogAT® is 160, while 100 is considered to be an average score.

Here are all the steps used to calculate a child’s unique test score:

  • Raw Score. This is total number of questions answered correctly; however, incorrect answers do not cause points to be deducted from the overall raw score.
  • Universal Scale Score (USS). After the Raw Score is determined, it’s converted to a normalized standard score known as the Universal Scale Score. There are separate USS scores for each of the test’s three verbal, nonverbal and quantitative reasoning skills subsections (also called “batteries”). The Composite USS is determined by averaging these three different scores.
  • Standard Age Score (SAS). The Standard Age Score has a maximum possible score of 160; the average score is 100.
  • Percentile Rank (PR). School districts use this number to compare students that share the same age and grade level. A percentile rank of 80 means that child’s score was higher than 80% of students who took the same test. The average percentile rank is 50.
  • Stanine (S). A stanine is a very broad, simplified score ranging from 1 (lowest) to 9 (highest possible), and it’s normalized for the child’s age and grade level.
Cognitive Abilities Test™ (CogAT®) is a registered trademark of Riverside Publishing, a Houghton Mifflin Company, or their affiliate(s), or their licensors. TestingMom.com is not affiliated with nor related to Houghton Mifflin Company or its affiliates (“Houghton Mifflin”). Houghton Mifflin does not sponsor or endorse any TestingMom.com product, nor have TestingMom.com products or services been reviewed, certified, or approved by Houghton Mifflin. Trademarks referring to specific test providers are used by TestingMom.com for nominative purposes only and such trademarks are solely the property of their respective owners.

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